For Sale

Here are just a few of the radios I am going to part with. All have been restored by me and are fully functional. I left the knobs unrestored on some just to show the orinignal finish and they will be refinished prior to delivery. I will be adding others shortly.

Sales Policy:

All radios are retested and cleaned at time of sale and are certified to be working when packed. However due to the fact these are 80 year old electronics, we are unable to warrant the radios after they have left our possession. We will pack all radios to be compliant with the carrier which in most cases will be USPS. We don't charge for packing materials, but customer will pay actual cost of delivery which is FOB origin. We do require the purchase be insured for the full values of the purchase to protect the buyer in the event that you have to file a claim. Payment must be made prior to shipping and we can accept PayPal with buyer covering the fee or we will accept a check or money order and the radio will be shipped once it has cleared the bank. We will be putting some console radios up for sale and they will only be shipped by Greyhound Bus Line.

 

SAFETY NOTICE:

These old radios have very high voltages and you should never put your hands inside the back of the radio and never attempt to perform any type of maintenance or repair and consult a qualified repair service for any electronic service on the radio. The electrolytic capacitors can retain high voltage for long periods of time, so even when the radio is not plugged in, you should never attempt to perform any service. We also don't recommend the radio be played more than 3 or 4 hours at a time and never leave the radio on when unattended.

Radios Currently Available

Art Deco Treasures From The 1930's

1936 Airline 62-317

SOLD $395.00 plus shipping

Airline is the brand name for Montgomery Wards stores and were actually manufactured for them by other radio manufacturers. The old finish was stripped and then refinished with period correct Mohawk Pefect Brown and Extra Dark Walnut toners. Multiple coats of Mohawk Nitrocellulose lacquer were applied with smoothong between coats. The original grille clothe was torn and was replaced with a beautiful period correct clothe. The chassis was throughly cleaned and all controls were cleaned and lubricated for smooth operation. A new tuning belt was installed. All electrolytic and wax/paper capacitors were replaced. All other components were tested and any that were out of tolerance, were replaced. The radio plays and sounds great and has been displayed in my home since restored.

1937 Majestic 60

SOLD $295.00 plus shipping

The Majestic brand name is manufactured by Majestic Tadio and Television Company. The ornante dial bezel with the eagle and the purple and yellow dial scale are very impressive. This one had some veneer missing and had some rust on the chassis, so it was really a labor of love to bring this one back. I removed the original finish, repaired the veneer and reapplied Mohawk toner and lacquer. The speaker grille clothe was badly deteriorated and replaced with a perfect clothe. The chassis was cleaned and painted with Restoleum Silver Hammered paint. All the controls were cleaned and lubricated. All of the electrolytic and wax/paper capacitors were replaced and the remaining components were tested and replaced if out of calabration. The tubes were tested and rplaced if bad or even weak. This is a classic looking 5 tube radio that plays and sounds good.

1938 Crosley 817 Super 8

$325.00 plus shipping

Crosley is the brand name of radios manufactured by The Crosley Radio Corporation of Cincinnati, Ohio. The Super 8 was the top of the line table radio for Crosley for the 1938 season. It has the famous gold mirrored dial, eye tubes and push pull audio for superior sound and a large 8" speaker. I stripped the old finish and retoned the walnut bands at top and bottom and highlighted the maple inlays. I polished up the brass dial bezel and brass bars above and below the speaker grille. The cabinet received multiple coats of Mohawk lacquer with smoothing with 0000 steel wool between coats. The speaker grille clothe was toast and was repalced with a period correct clothe. The chassis was cleaned and all controls were cleaned and lubricated. All the electrolytic and wax/paper capacitors were replaced and all other components were tested and if out of tolerance, were replaced. All the tubes were tested on my Hickok tube tester and defective or even weak tubes were replaced. The radio has good sound and plenty of it.

SOLD 1937 Silvertone 4565

$595.00.00 plus shipping

Silvertone is the brand name for Sears and Roebuck stores and were actually manufactured for them by other radio manufacturers. This radio is a large table top model and incorporates the beautiful and highly sought after 75th Anniversary ornate large gold dial. This radio has mulitple tone adjustments and high tube count and the green eye in the middle of the dial is very impressive and beautiful to behold. I saw another one of these that was restored by a master restorer and he had varied the tone color on each veneer panel across the front and I thought it was much better than the orignal one tone front and decided to strip the reddish finish and replace it with the multi tone front. The speaker grille clothe was in bad shape and was replaced with a period correct clothe.

1940 Emerson DS-436

$595.00 plus shipping

Emerson is the brand name for the Emerson Radio and Phonograph Corporation of New York, New York. The picture is before the radio was restored. When you click on Explore at the bottom, you will see pictures of the restoration. This radio is one of my favorites and is a real bohemoth. It has 9 tubes with push pull audio and tons of bass and volume. The original finish had yellowed and was fully stripped and was toned with Mohawk Medium Brown Walnut and then cleared with Mohawk Nitrocellulose Lacquer. The plastic dial covered was yellowed and replaced with an exact reproduction. All of the electrolytic and wax/paper capacitors were replaced and all other components were tested and were replaced if out of tolerance. All the tubes were tested and replaced if weak or defective. A new old stock tuning eye tube was installed and works very well. All the controls were cleaned and lubricated for smooth operation and the chassis was painted with Rustoleum Silver Hammered paint. All of the decals were replaced on the cabinet with exact water slide reproduction decals. This is a real player and will fill the room with the warm sound that can only be produced by an anaolg tube radio.

1938 Crosley 817 Super 8

$325.00 plus shipping

Crosley is the brand name of radios manufactured by The Crosley Radio Corporation of Cincinnati, Ohio. The Super 8 was the top of the line table radio for Crosley for the 1938 season. It has the famous gold mirrored dial, eye tubes and push pull audio for superior sound and a large 8" speaker. I stripped the old finish and retoned the walnut bands at top and bottom and highlighted the maple inlays. I polished up the brass dial bezel and brass bars above and below the speaker grille. The cabinet received multiple coats of Mohawk lacquer with smoothing with 0000 steel wool between coats. The speaker grille clothe was toast and was repalced with a period correct clothe. The chassis was cleaned and all controls were cleaned and lubricated. All the electrolytic and wax/paper capacitors were replaced and all other components were tested and if out of tolerance, were replaced. All the tubes were tested on my Hickok tube tester and defective or even weak tubes were replaced. The radio has good sound and plenty of it.

1939 Slivertone 6120A

$315.00 plus shipping

1939 Silvertone 6120A

 

$315.00 plus shipping

 

Silvertone is the brand name Sears and Roebuck marketed their radios under. There is disagreement as to whether the cabinet was made by Ingraham Cabinet Co. of Bristol, CT. This is an AC/DC set and is set to AC. It has 6 tubes including the green tuning eye. This one was in fairly good cosmetic condition and didn't have any loose or chipped veneer. I stripped the cabinet and used Mohawk Extra Dark Walnut on the speaker grille, top and bottom bands and Perfect Brown on the rest of the cabinet. The plastic dial cover was yellowed and was replaced. The chassis was cleaned and all controls were cleaned and lubricated for smooth operation. The tubes were tested and the ballast tube and tuning eye were weak and were replaced with NOS tubes. All of the electrolytic and wax/paper capacitors were replaced with current production Mylar capacitors. All resistors were checked and any out of tolerance were replaced. A new polarized AC cord was installed for safety and I fired it up and was pleasantly surprised at the sound quality from a small table top set.

1939 Silvertone 6250

$315.00 plus shipping

This is a small table top that uses the same chassis as the 1939 Silvertone 6120A which I have for sale as well. This one was pretty rough and has a small 1/2 inch wide split in the top right front corner where the veneer waterfalls over the front of the radio, but doesn't detract from its attractiveness. I dismantled the radio and cleaned the chassis and cleaned and lubed the controls. All the tubes were tested and weak or defective tubes were rplaced with NOS tubes. All electrolytic and wax/paper capacitors were replaced with current production Mylar capacitors. I installed a new polarized AC cord for safety. I stripped off all the old finish and retoned the cabinet with Mohawk nitocellulose Warm Brown Walnut and Perfect Brown toner. I then applied numerous coats of Mohawk gloss clear lacquer with light smoothing betwwen coats. The plastic dial lense was cracked and was replaced. I reassembled the radio and turned it on and as expected it played identical to the 6120A.

1936 Stewart Warner R-1721-A

SOLD $375.00 plus shipping

Stewart Warner is more known for their automotive industry manufacturing, but they also built quality AM broadcast radios and cabinets. This is a large table top radio with 6 tubes including the green tuning eye. I disassmbled the radio and cleaned the chassis and cleaned and lubricated all the controls. All the tubes were tested and weak of defective tubes were replaced with NOS tubes. All of the electrolytic and wax/paper capacitors were replaced and the resistors were checked and all out of tolerance resistors were replaced. A new polarized AC cord was installed for safety. I stripped the cabinet and refinished with Mohawk nitrocelulose toner and lacquer. The grille clothe had been replaced in the past and was not attractive, so I replaced it with a much better quality and color clothe. I reassembled the radio and enojyed it for several days.

1938 Packard Bell 48B

SOLD $395.00 plus shipping

Packard Bell was a west coast manufacturer and starting making AM broadcast radios in 1934. They are famous for the "Staionized" dial of which this was a standout for Packard Bell. This model was the top of the line for the 46 and 48 series radio. It had dual cat eyes and 8 tubes. I disassembled the radio and cleaned up the chassis. I cleaned and lubricated all the controls and replaced all the electrolytic and wax/paper caps with new Mylar caps. All of the resistors were tested and any out of tolerance were replaced. All tubes were tested and any that tested defective or even weak were replaced with NOS tubes. A new polarized AC cord was installed for safety. The cabinet was stripped and lightly toned and the bands were toned darker for a nice contrast where the faux bands had been. It received several coats of clear lacquer with light smoothing between coats. All toners and lacquer are made by Mohawk. The radio was reassembled and is sitting in my living room. I really enjoy listening to the radio and looking at the ultra-cool dial. I have a second one of these I haven't restored yet or I wouldn't be letting this one go.

1939 Sparton 620M

SOLD $395.00 plus shipping

This is a beautiful cabinet with multiple veneers and inlays defining the sections. A picture can't do this justice. I have only seen one other of this model radio, so it is a pretty rare set. I disassembled the radio and cleaned up the chassis, lubed the controls and replaced all the eleotrolytics and wa/paper capacitors. All tubes were tested and poor or bad tubes were replaced with NOS tubes. All resistors were checked and any out of tolerance were replaced. This chassis has a spring loaded tuning shaft and it has a cone shaped rubber tip that when you push in on the knob the rubber tip contacts a wheel attached to the tuning capacitor and moves the dial. The rubber had hardened and had a flat side from sitting in the same position for years. I used Liquid Electricians Tape to coat the tip and fill in the flat spot. It works perfectly now. I stripped the cabinet used three color tones to refinish the cabinet and cleared it with Mohawk nitrocellulose semi-gloss. I put it all back togther and it enjoys a prominant place in my home office.

1937 Airline 62-419

$525.00 plus shipping

Airline is the brand name for Montgomery Wards Department Store. They didn't manufacture any of their sets, they were manufactured by a number of manufacturers over the years. It sold for $42.95 in 1937 which would be $729.33 today. This one was clearly one of the top table radios for the 1937 line up and is a beast of a player. It has 9 tubes including the dial mounted green tuning eye and an 8" speaker. It also has a Hi-Fi setting on the tone switch and is a joy to listen to. I don't recommend these old radios be played more that a few hours at a time. However I leave them on for at least 8 ours after restoration and play for a ggod week to confirm reliabilty. I kept this one as my daily player for several weeks and it never disappointed. I liked it so much I looked for another one, but this is the only one I found. The cabinet was very solid and the finish really wasn't to bad, but I stripped it down and refinished it and was very glad I did. It really improved the look of the radio. The grille clothe was toast and was replaced. The chassis was cleaned and all the controls were cleaned and oiled for smooth operation. Someone had cut out a peice of red construction paper and put behind the dial glass and I removed it to uncover the nice gold dial. All the tubes were tested and I replaced any that bad or even if they tested weak. I replaced all the electrolytic caps and the wax/paper caps with new Mylar caps. All the resistors were checked and replaced if out of tolerance.